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Programme overview

Do you want a role in the re-imagining of our urban environment and re-thinking of our cities? Landscape architects are employed for their vision and skill in transforming the spaces of everyday life, and in solving the real and serious environmental issues facing today's society. Landscape architecture brings together science, technology, art and design, in order to engage in a broad range of environmental design projects. These can involve urban design, transportation infrastructure, waterfronts and resorts, coastal, estuarine and in-land ecologies, and creating engaging and vibrant community and public spaces.

The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture is an internationally accredited professional programme that will prepare you for a creative practice in urban and environmental design anywhere in the world.

Highlights

  • A focus on design studio and one-on-one practice-based learning that supports your individual skills and growth as a designer.
  • Real-world learning that involves regular engagement and both collaborative and competitive work with practising professionals, including award-winning landscape architects, urban designers, architects and other related professionals.
  • Be part of international study tours and a vibrant exchange programme - important keys to understanding international practice.
  • Access to internships and merit-based awards.
  • A fully accredited degree programme, registered by the New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects (NZILA) on behalf of the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA).

Portfolio requirements

If you are invited for an interview, you should bring a CV and portfolio of work with you. Your portfolio should demonstrate an ability to explore, develop and communicate artistic and design ideas.

You should include a range of design and graphic work that illustrates consideration of space, material, form and texture. You may include examples of painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, life drawing, collage, computer-generated images, and built or constructed work. You should present at least 10 sheets of work in an A3 or A2 folder.

Follow our portfolio guidelines on what to include, what not to include and how to lay it all out.

Admission requirements

To be eligible for admission, applicants must meet the general, or the discretionary, or the special admission requirements and they must also meet any programme-specific admission requirements. Applicants must also meet the English language requirements and may be interviewed.

Generic Admission Requirements

General Admission

Applicants must have:

  1. A minimum of 42 credits at NCEA Level 3 or higher on the National Qualifications Framework, with 14 credits at Level 3 or higher in each of two subjects from an approved subject list, with a further 14 credits at Level 3 or higher taken from no more than two additional domains on the National Qualifications Framework or approved subjects plus a minimum of 14 credits at Level 1 or higher in Mathematics or Pangarau on the National Qualifications Framework, plus a minimum of 8 credits at Level 2 or higher in English or Te Reo Maori; a minimum of 4 credits must be in Reading and a minimum of 4 credits must be in Writing; OR
  2. At least 3 ‘C’ passes in the New Zealand University Bursaries Examinations; OR
  3. Successful completion of the Unitec Certificate in Foundation Studies: Whitinga Level 3 with a relevant pathway, where appropriate;OR
  4. Certificate of University Preparation (Level 4); OR
  5. Certificate in Foundation Studies (Level 4); OR
  6. Equivalent

Special Admission

Applicants must have: 

  1. Attained the age of 20 years on or before the first day of the semester in which study for the degree is to commence; AND 
  2. Have provided sufficient evidence of aptitude or appropriate work or other life experience that would indicate a potential successful outcome in the qualification. 

Discretionary Admission

In exceptional cases an applicant who does not meet the general admission requirements and who has not reached the age of 20 on or before the first day of the semester in which study for the degree is to commence may apply for discretionary admission.

In assessing whether to grant discretionary admission in exceptional cases, the primary focus will be on the applicant’s level of preparedness for study at the required level.

English Language Admission Requirements

General English Language Requirements
Applicants must have achieved a minimum standard of English as demonstrated by a minimum of 8 credits at NCEA Level 2 in English (4 in Reading, 4 in Writing).

International Students for whom English is not their First Language
Applicants must have achieved one of the following:

  1. Completion of NZ Certificate in English Language (NZCEL), Academic, Level 4;
  2. An overall IELTS band score (Academic Format) of 6 with no band score lower than 5.5;
  3. An overall TOEFL pBT (Paper-based Test) score of 550 (plus essay TWE of 5) OR  an overall TOEFL iBT (Internet-based Test ) score of 60 (plus writing score of 20);
  4. Level B2 under the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR);
  5. First Certificate in English (FCE) with a pass at grade B OR Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) with a score of 52 or higher under the Cambridge International standard tests of English as a foreign language;
  6. Pearson Test of English (PToE) (Academic) with a score of 50;
  7. City & Guilds Internal English for Speakers of Other Languages (IESOL) B2 Communicator with a score of 66.

Existing English Language Proficiency
Applicants may also provide evidence of satisfying one of the criteria for existing English proficiency as specified by the NZQA. For more information please visit the NZQA website.

Programme Specific Admission Requirements

To be admitted to this programme, applicants must also meet the requirements set out in this schedule.

Specific Admission

  1. Applicants from a non-English speaking background must, in addition, have an overall IELTS (Academic) band score of at least 6.5 with no band score lower than 6.0 or a TOEFL score of no less than 575, or equivalent.

Discretionary Admission

Applicants may be granted Discretionary Admission if they have, for example:

  1. A minimum total of 72 NCEA credits at level 2 in their best 4 subjects, or equivalent.
  2. A maximum total of 12 in New Zealand Sixth Form Certificate in their best four subjects or equivalent.

Courses and timetables

The following courses are valid for 2014. The courses may be offered as part of the programme. Click on the course links below to see the course details and timetables.

CoursesCredits Restrictions
Visual Communication 2 (LAND5013) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To introduce digital graphic media/techniques and develop the fundamental skills necessary for effective visual communication.
Studio 1 (LAND5021) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To introduce students to the principles of landscape architecture through investigation by design.
Landscape History (LAND5111) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To explore the development of landscape architectural expression through history and across cultures from earliest recorded settlement to the present day.
Visual Communication 1 (LAND5113) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To introduce graphic media/techniques and develop the fundamental skills necessary for effective visual communication.
Studio 2 (LAND5222) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To introduce, explore and develop vocabularies of landscape architecture through investigation by design.
Studio 3 (LAND5223) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To introduce, explore and develop vocabularies of landscape architecture through investigation by design.
Earth Processes (NSCI5730) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To provide a scientific understanding of physical and chemical processes and their interactions which are essential to life on Earth.
CoursesCredits Restrictions
Landscape of Aotearoa (LAND6012) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To explore the evolution of Tangata and Whenua in Aotearoa New Zealand, in terms of Te Ao Maori (the Maori world view) and Western worlds.
Contemporary Landscapes (LAND6115) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To cultivate an appreciation of contemporary landscape practice and theory in Europe, America and Australasia.
Studio 4 (LAND6224) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To configure a way in which aspects of cultural production can be used as a strategy to resolve both technical and conceptual aspects of design work.
Studio 5 (LAND6225) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To reinforce and build on the range of conventions of landscape architectural production introduced in previous studios, through the generation of design strategies which address the complexity of context, site and programme. This year encourages an increasingly aware and critical application of these strategies and procedures, testing different combinations of strategies, on increasingly complex sites, operating at many levels, and a variety of scales. Design projects explore the way in which ideas about landscape, techniques and methods for dealing with landscapes and ways of communicating about design are all related to each other, and can influence the process of design.
CAD Studio (LAND6230) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To provide a fast paced intermediate introduction to the application of computers in landscape architectural design.
Landscape Planning Assessment and Management (LAND6338) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To introduce and explore the theoretical and legislative basis of landscape planning and its application in practice.
CoursesCredits Restrictions
Studio 6 (LAND7226) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To introduce students to different approaches to landscape architectural design by exposing them to the work and design strategies of important accomplished contemporary practitioners with divergent points of view, interest and backgrounds. To enable students to investigate landscape issues by means of design.
Studio 7 (LAND7227) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To demonstrate the development of personal design philosophy and strategies through advanced landscape architectural design.
Professional Practice (LAND7334) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To introduce students to professional relationships and responsibilities and make them aware of contractual, ethical, professional and inter-professional roles.
Urban Ecology (LAND7401) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To develop an understanding of the interrelationships between people, the built environment, the natural environment, and the role of landscape architecture.
CoursesCredits Restrictions
Negotiated Study (Sem A) (LAND8000-SA) 60 credits (0.5 EFTS)To demonstrate the development of personal philosophy and landscape architectural strategies through the completion of a self-directed, advanced landscape architectural research project.
Negotiated Study (Sem B) (LAND8000-SB) 60 credits (0.5 EFTS)To demonstrate the development of personal philosophy and landscape architectural strategies through the completion of a self-directed, advanced landscape architectural research project.
CoursesCredits Restrictions
Design of Cities (LAND5114) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To introduce students to basic concepts in urban design in a global, historial perspective.
CoursesCredits Restrictions
Negotiated Study (LAND6000) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To produce a publication that develops a professional understanding of design presentation in landscape architecture.
Negotiated Study (Publication) (LAND6001) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To produce a publication that develops a professional understanding of design presentation in landscape architecture
Negotiated Study (Exchange) (LAND6050) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To develop specific skills and competencies in landscape architecture through non-local semester exchange.
3D Rendering with Vue (LAND6340) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)Students will learn to use e-on software’s Vue Infinite to produce highly detailed 3D renders of exterior spaces.
Landscape Ecology (LAND6401) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To explore the theory and practice of ecology in relation to landscape architecture.
Plants, People and Landscapes (LAND6402) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To develop an understanding of the origins of the human/plant relationship, in particular the history of agriculture and to explore the evolving relationships between plants and global cultures and how they have impacted on the landscape.
CoursesCredits Restrictions
Negotiated Study (Study Tour) (LAND7001) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To directly experience, and develop a specific interest in a landscape, within a specified non-local context.
Negotiated Study (Study Tour) (LAND7002) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To directly experience, and develop a specific interest in a landscape, within a specified non-local context.
Drawing (LAND7013) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To develop observational skills and drawing ability through rendering of architecture, landscape and the human figure.
Negotiated Study (Exchange) (LAND7050) 30 credits (0.25 EFTS)To develop specific skills and competencies in landscape architecture through non-local semester exchange.
Landscape Theory (LAND7115) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To explore the foundation of European and American Landscape theory through an analysis of the work of landscape and garden writers from the Renaissance to the 20th century.
FilmCAD (LAND7230) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)A self-directed investigation of animation that portrays landscapes through moving and still images and the techniques drawn from film.
Pacific Regional Studies (LAND7331) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To assess the impact of Europeans on the lifestyles and landscapes of the indigenous peoples of the pacific region, with particular reference to the impact of economic development on their environments.
Generative Design (LAND7627) 15 credits (0.125 EFTS)To develop skills in algorithmic and generative design and fabrication using 3D modelling and visual programming languages.